Genadyne Consulting
Plant Genomics & Developmental Biology Consultant / Expert Offering Creative Paradigms for Scientific Advancement in Agriculture and Medicine, with Emphasis on Plant Genetics / Genetic Engineering and Developmental Biology, e.g., Organogenesis.
Michael M. Lieber, Ph.D. Berkeley, CA (510) 526-4224


Through genetics research, control of gene function is incompletely understood.

DNA microarray technology and bioinformatics have enabled some advances in the understanding and manipulation of gene behavior in simple, developmental models. These advances have medical implications, especially with regard to the treatment of carcinogenesis.

There remains, nevertheless, major problems, such as those that pertain to the genomic control of mutation --- especially of hypermutation --- which prevent a complete understanding and hence a comprehensive, effective application of the new biotechnologies and the imaginative creation of new ones. This is especially the situation in the context of investigating, unstable gene behavior within complex, developmental systems, both in vivo and in vitro.

One can reconceptualize biological investigations / experiments in order to solve these problems.

Through my extensive and diversified training and experience in the genetic / epigenetic control of mutation and in vitro development, as well as in its theoretical aspects, I can define those problems and provide in depth solutions, which have significant implications for developmental genetics.

In general, such solutions would require new, related paradigms, suggesting investigations along new avenues. This would result in comprehensive, in depth, and thus effective, medical and agricultural applications.

As a Consultant to certain companies or laboratories, I could comprehensively illustrate the problems and in turn develop solutions---perhaps in collaboration with scientists who would be open to exploring new paradigms---that would ultimately give forth powerful applications.

With regard to in vitro developmental systems, I have a broad background in various facets of genetics, including the transgenic transformation of plants for disease resistance.


My specialty has been in developing procedures for overcoming recalcitrant organogenesis and embryogenesis from plant tumor (callus) in tissue culture of various plant species, including trees, an important requirement, for recovering transgenic plantlets by way of transformed callus in vitro. Pine, bean, and tobacco were amongst the plants investigated in tissue culture by this author (Lieber, 1980a, 1995, 1996).

The photographs (Figures 1a thru 6 and Figures 15a thru 19) are examples of my experiments leading to successful plantlet, bud, and embyogenic development at high frequency in vitro, where factors inhibiting in vitro development were repeatedly overcome.

Such experiments are the results of a successful application of a principle within a comprehensive theory pertaining to non-uniform forces (stress) presented to the organism in different ways and their role in biological development (Lieber, 1996, 1998a, 1998b, 1998c, 2000, 2001a, 2001b) [ and weblinks].

This principle becomes apparent, among other ways, through the manifestation of a universal, dimensionless biological constant, first noted by the author (Lieber, 1998a)

This constant, numerically equivalent to the Golden Ratio, 1.618, was found to compose the dimensional constants of physics. Among other matters, this constant defines or manifests an underlying developmental, dynamical pattern in all physical and biological phenomena.

For example, this dimensionless constant is readily seen as contributing to the Planck Length. The latter is a dimensional constant which refers to the connection between gravitational force and quantum processes in a nearly infinitesimal region of space-time and suggests, because of its dimensionless component, a particular dynamic pattern, a spiral generation, operating through that connection.

On the much higher organizational level or scale of biological phenomena, this dynamical pattern is readily manifested in the spiral/vortical morphology of many plants and animals, and their parts, e.g., pinecones. Photographs (Figures 9a thru 14) show this particular morphology.

Adaptively responsive hypermutation to stress, manifested as non-uniform forces, is a phenomenon that is also predicted by the principle and its biological constant. Using the fungus Aspergillus nidulans, experimental conditions and genetic strains were created by the author that demonstrated this type of mutagenesis in response to a physical stress in the fungus and its importance for development (Lieber, 1975c, 1976b, 1998b) [and weblinks].

The importance of this research was described in a personal letter by the Nobel Laureate, Dr. Barbara McClintock. Photographs show some examples of this phenomenon (Figures 7 & 8 ).

Later research by the author demonstrated adaptively responsive hypermutation to nutritional stress in bacteria. Such stress could be manifested or presented as non-uniform force-magnitudes. See Lieber, 1980b; Lieber & Persidock, 1983; Lieber, 1989, 1990, 1998b,1998c, 2000, 2001a [and weblinks].

This research predicted problems and implied solutions to such (Lieber, 1989) which are currently being addressed in plant genetics research (Lieber, 2005). Moreover, the findings, using bacteria, were later confirmed by other scientists. (References are given in my publications.)

Such research has begun to open up a whole new way of looking at mutagenesis, especially its relationship to disease and to the development of beneficial crops and trees.

However, to be even more effective, the medical and agricultural sciences require newer, more completed, developed approaches utilizing new and more completed theoretical models or paradigms.

A comprehensive, new theory is needed, not just facets or parts of such. Without new theory, on which scientific progress has been based, the biological sciences will eventually stagnate; consequently, they will be unable to address key problems, calling for creative approaches, thus jeopardizing the future of human progress and development.

Because of my broad experience in the biological sciences, creativity, and in-depth approach, I have provided and am able to provide new, effective theoretical perspectives and breakthroughs on research issues in biology, especially as they pertain to mutation, gene function, development, and adaptation. In this way, I could, as a Consultant, provide a valuable service in any research endeavor.

For example, I can provide detailed protocols---as opposed to conventional protocols---that enable a high frequency of plant development (regeneration) from plant neoplasm in culture.

If you want to review such a protocol for a given plant species, this would be provided for at a very reasonable fee.

I can also provide
on-site advice/support at your laboratory or agency.

For more infornation please refer to Biography of Michael Lieber.

I can be contacted at Genadyne Consulting, Phone: (510) 526-4224

E-mail: michaellieber@juno.com Michael M. Lieber, Ph.D.
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CAPTIONS for PHOTOGRAPHS

Figure 1a - Very small embryonic pine-plantlet (top center) emerging from brown inhibited callus (neoplasm) derived from a pine needle.

Figure 1b - Pine bud emerging from callus derived from a pine needle.

Figure 1c - Pine shoot growing from callus derived from a pine needle.

Figure 1d - Small male pine-cone developed from pine-needle callus.

Figure 1e - Pine shoot growing form callus derived from pine needle.

Figure 2 - Bean plantlets and buds emerging from callus having an immature-embryo source.

Figure 3a - Bean embryos regenerated from somatic callus derived from a shoot apex. Many embryos have produced plantlet-shoots.

Figure 3b - Embryogenesis from bean callus producing bean shoots. Callus was derived from the meristem of a bud apex.

Figure 3c - Embryogenesis from another bean callus poducing bean shoots


Figure 4 - Buds in various developmental stages emerging from callus derived from a shoot apex of the green bean.

Figure 5 - Bean plantlets regenerated from meristemic callus of a shoot apex.

Figure 6 - Buds and plantlets regenerated from meristemic bean-callus of a shoot apex.

Figure 7 - An example of hypermutation in the fungus, Aspergillus nidulans, cultured under stress.

Figure 8 - Adaptively responsive hypermutation in Aspergillus cultured under an increased-temperature stress.

Figure 9a - Pine cone displaying seed nodules arranged in logarithmic spirals.

Figure 9b - Bottom of a pine cone displaying a spiral morphology.

Figures - 10a and 10b - Vortical cacti.

Figure 11 - Cactus with a spiral morphology.

Figure 12 - Helical tendril of a vine.

Figure 13 - Two roses, each with a vortical design.

Figure 14 - A gastropod shell with a spiral morphology.


Figure 15a - Deteriorated pine buds from needle callus. Pinus taeda.

Figure 15b - Non-Deteriorated pine bud from needle callus. Pinus taeda.

Figure 16 - Small, clustered pine buds from needle callus and tiny pinelet from callus on far left side . Pinus muricata.

Figure 17 - Small pine buds from needle callus and possible, tiny pinelets from callus in central region of photo. Pinus muricata.  A definite pine plantlet with branches is located on the left side of the brown callus.

Figure 18 - Tiny pinelet from needle callus in middle of culture, with two other possible pinelets nearby. Buds from callus also present. Pinus muricata.

Figure 19 -
Bean plantlets regenerated from callus cultured on medium with methylglyoxal but without ascorbic acid.

MICHAEL LIEBER's SCIENTIFIC ARTICLES and REPORTS

New_Pespective_on_Plant_Tissue_Culture

Adaptively_Responsive_Mutation_of_the Karyotype

Dimensionless-Biological-Constant-φ

Spiral-Dimensionless-Biological-Constant-in-Physical-Constants

Dimensionless-ϕ

 

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Click To Enlarge Photos
Figure 1a - Very small embryonic pine-plantlet (top center)  emerging from brown inhibited callus (neoplasm) derived from a pine needle. Click pics to enlarge.
Figure 1a
Figure 1b - Pine bud emerging from callus derived from a pine needle. Click to enlarge.
Figure 1b
Figure 1c. Click to enlarge. Small pine shoots growing from callus derived from a pine needle. Figure 1cFigure 1d - Click to enlarge picture of a small male pine-cone that has developed from pine-needle callus. Figure 1dFigure 1e - Click to enlarge picture of pine shoot growing from callus derived from a pine needle. (colour photo) Figure 1e
Figure 2  - Bean plantlets and buds emerging from callus having an immature-embryo source.  Click to enlarge.
Figure 2
Figure 3 - Bean embryos regenerated from somatic callus derived from a shoot apex. Many embryos have produced plantlet-shoots.  Click to enlarge.
Figure 3a
Figure 3b - Click to enlarge pic of embryogenesis from bean callus producing bean shoots. Callus derived from meristem of bud apex.
Figure 3b
Figure 3 - Click to enlarge photos of experiments - Embryogenesis from another bean callus producing bean shoots. All photos (c) Michael M. Lieber
Figure 3c
Figure 4 - Buds in various developmental stages emerging from callus derived from a shoot apex of the green bean. Click to enlarge.
Figure 4
Figure 5 - Bean plantlets regenerated from meristemic callus of a shoot apex. Click to enlarge.
Figure 5
Figure 6 - Buds and plantlets regenerated from meristemic bean-callus of a shoot apex.  Click to enlarge.
Figure 6
Figure 7 - An example of hypermutation in the fungus, Aspergillus nidulans, cultured under stress. Click to enlarge.
Figure 7
Figure 8 - Adaptively responsive hypermutation in Aspergillus cultured under an increased-temperature stress. Click to enlarge.
Figure 8
Figure 9a  -  Pine cone displaying seed nodules arranged in logarithmic spirals. Click to enlarge.
Figure 9a
Figure 9b - Bottom of a pine cone displaying a spiral morphology. Click to enlarge.
Figure 9b
Figures -  10a and 10b - Vortical cacti. Click to enlarge.
Figure 10a
Figures -  10a and 10b - Vortical cacti. Click to enlarge.
Figure 10b
Figure 11 - Cactus with a spiral morphology. Click to enlarge.
Figure 11
Figure 12 - Helical tendril of a vine. Click to enlarge.
Figure 12
Figure 13 - Two roses, each with a vortical design. Click to enlarge.
Figure 13
Figure 14 - A gastropod shell with a spiral morphology. Click to enlarge.
Figure 14
Figure 15a - Deteriorated pine buds from needle callus. Pinus taeda. Click to enlarge.
Figure 15a
Figure 15b. Non-Deteriorated pine bud from needle callus. Pinus taeda. Click to enlarge.
Figure 15b
Small, clustered pine buds from needle callus and tiny pinelet from callus on far left side .  Pinus muricata. Click to enlarge.
Figure 16
Small pine buds from needle callus and possible, tiny pinelets from callus in central region of photo. Pinus muricata. A definite pine plantlet with branches is located on the left side of the brown callus.
Figure 17
Figure 18. Tiny pinelet from needle callus in middle of culture, with two other possible pinelets nearby. Buds from callus also present. Pinus muricata.
Figure 18
Figure 19. Bean plantlets regenerated from callus cultured on medium with methylglyoxal but without ascorbic acid.
Figure 19

Micahel M. Lieber Developmental Geneticist Biological Research Consulting and Editing Services Berkeley California

MichaelLieber.com (c) Michael M. Lieber, Genadyne Consulting
E-Mail: michaellieber@juno.com Phone:
(510) 526-4224

All photos and written content (c) Michael M. Lieber
Website Last Updated 3/7/2015
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